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About
Virginia Woolf ..
But looking for eloquent phrases I found none to stand beside your name.

(25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) 


Creator:
Tarkovskologist  
wordsfullofechoes 

“Woolf needs to be read and taught as a poet because her exactness more closely resembles poetry than prose. She has the cardinal virtue of critical courage, sifting her ideas and her impressions through a fine riddle of words, and the clumsiness and the uncertainties drop away, leaving her with word and thing, rare and rich.”

— Jeanette Winterson on Virginia Woolf 

5:06 pm  23 notes

“… she cherished a profound admiration for other people. To be them would be marvellous, but she was condemned to be herself and could only in this silent enthusiastic way, sitting outside in a garden, applaud the society of humanity from which she was excluded. Tags of poetry in praise of them rose to her lips; they were adorable and good.”

Virginia Woolf, A Summing Up

4:52 pm  9 notes




Virginia Woolf, A Sketch of the Past



"The clarity and seriousness of this passage thrills me to the core; all the more so for knowing how tenuous is the effort to make it happen in a life or a piece of work, to bring the world into focus as if for the first time. “I am the thing in which all this exists.” This “thing” Woolf writes about so often rings in my brain, “the thing itself,” over and over again, the core, the form, the life force, the mystery, the point of everything. How daring the use of this word is, how precise its evocation. This thing, a life, something, her life, my life, patterns and connections, finding patterns behind the words."
— Suzanne Bellamy

4:36 pm  26 notes

Virginia Woolf, A Sketch of the Past

"The clarity and seriousness of this passage thrills me to the core; all the more so for knowing how tenuous is the effort to make it happen in a life or a piece of work, to bring the world into focus as if for the first time. “I am the thing in which all this exists.” This “thing” Woolf writes about so often rings in my brain, “the thing itself,” over and over again, the core, the form, the life force, the mystery, the point of everything. How daring the use of this word is, how precise its evocation. This thing, a life, something, her life, my life, patterns and connections, finding patterns behind the words."

— Suzanne Bellamy

“Where people mistake, as I think, is in perpetually narrowing and naming these immensely composite and wide flung passions—driving stakes through them, herding them between screens.”

Virginia Woolf, Selected Letters

3:37 pm  61 notes

“I am obsessed with a foolish idea that I have no time to stop & write […] the truth is, I must try to set aside half an hour in some part of my day, & consecrate it to diary writing. Give it a name & a place, & then perhaps, such is the human mind, I shall come to think it a duty, & disregard other duties for it.”

— Virginia Woolf, from a diary entry dated, 8 April 1925

3:22 pm  24 notes

3:22 pm  156 notes

Virginia Woolf, Vita Sackville-West and two dogs sitting on a grass bank. Monk’s House (Rodmell, England), 1933.

I try to invent you for myself, but find I really have only 2 twigs and 3 straws to do it with. I can get the sensation of seeing you—hair, lips, colour, height, even, now and then, the eyes and hands, but I find you going off, to walk in the garden, to play tennis, to dig, to sit smoking and talking, and then I cant invent a thing you say—This proves, what I could write reams about—how little we know anyone, only movements and gestures, nothing connected, continuous, profound. But give me a hint I implore.”

— Virginia Woolf in a letter to Vita Sackville-West

“I can only note that the past is beautiful because one never realises an emotion at the time. It expands later, & thus we don’t have complete emotions about the present, only about the past.”

— Virginia Woolf, in her diary, 18 March 1925

3:13 pm  141 notes

“And dont for a moment think of coming and doing anything here; that would be simply a silly waste of time, (except kiss me).”

— Virginia Woolf in a letter to Vita Sackville-West

3:01 pm  71 notes

“This is always so. A great part of every day is not lived consciously.”

Virginia Woolf, A Sketch of the Past

3:00 pm  24 notes

“… and her sorrow was very lonely. Perhaps one would come into a room unexpectedly, and surprise her in tears, and, to one’s miserable confusion, she would hide them instantly, and speak ordinary words, as though she did not imagine that one could understand her suffering.”

Virginia Woolf, Moments of Being

2:54 pm  22 notes

“Of course it will give me enormous pleasure to have your poem dedicated to me, … I should fling my arms round you and tell you so. Yes; it gives me enormous pleasure.”

— Virginia Woolf in a letter to George Rylands

2:46 pm  8 notes

“L. [Leonard] and I on top looking at all the glories of London, which are romantically, sentimentally, incredibly dear to me.”

Virginia Woolf, Selected Letters

2:43 pm  8 notes

 Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway

2:37 pm  4 notes

Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway

“How can I cure my violent moods? I wish you’d tell me. Oh such despairs, and wooden hearted long droughts when the heart of an oak in which a toad sits imprisoned has more sap and green than my heart.”

— Virginia Woolf in a letter to Ethel Smith

2:36 pm  30 notes